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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The farm/ranch were aquiring does not come with a barn. It does come with an innordinant amount of trees just ripe for the picking.
This is the proposed mill were looking at. Model 1600
Hence we will cut the wood to build the timber framed barn with the band saw mill. It's gonna be a huge barn too. ;)
 

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performing monkey
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where do you plan on storing the timber while it cures?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
where do you plan on storing the timber while it cures?
I will just build a multi million dollar computer controled kiln just like the used 1200 years ago when they built Venice. Just kidding. This will built out of green wood. Just like they did 1200 years ago. ;) Ever heard of a church group that call themselves the Amish?
 

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performing monkey
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I will just build a multi million dollar computer controled kiln just like the used 1200 years ago when they built Venice. Just kidding. This will built out of green wood. Just like they did 1200 years ago. ;) Ever heard of a church group that call themselves the Amish?
really?... :rolleyes:

If the lumber is used green (not sufficiently air dried or kiln dried) it will tend to warp or distort in other ways as the drying process happens over time. One farmer locally lost his home to a fire. In an effort to rebuild quickly he used green lumber in his home. Over time, the lumber dried out as the heater ran in the winter and the sun heated up the structure in the summer. The result was very uneven floors from the bowed floor joists, bowed walls and sticking doors. :nuts:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
really?... :rolleyes:

If the lumber is used green (not sufficiently air dried or kiln dried) it will tend to warp or distort in other ways as the drying process happens over time. One farmer locally lost his home to a fire. In an effort to rebuild quickly he used green lumber in his home. Over time, the lumber dried out as the heater ran in the winter and the sun heated up the structure in the summer. The result was very uneven floors from the bowed floor joists, bowed walls and sticking doors. :nuts:
Please try and not think neo modern building technique. This barn is mortices and tenoned together. The components are not 2X4's or 2x6's but huge beams.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Building with green lumber
Ralph_Beaty on Sat, 12/15/2001 - 02:07 in The Archives
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I am in the process of building a tree house for my sons and have access to three local sawmills that are now cutting white oak. I would like to use white oak for the foundation and support structure because of its strength and durability. The only problem is the sawmills only have green white oak.

I have gone to Lowes and Home Depot for pressure treated pine, and since it's stored outdoors, it's also wet.

In my opinion, both the white oak and PT pine are going to shrink once I secure them to the trees. Yet I fear either may pull out of square or level in the tree, making playing in it dangerous.

I am familiar with an early structure Frank Lloyd Wright built out of green lumber in the early 1920's, using it right on top of the dirt foundation. Of course, the structure is now in need of serious structural repair. However, for my purposes at present I'm thinking that if a green-wood built house can last this long, then surely a green-wood built tree house foundation would meet my needs.

Any input you can provide would be appreciated.

Thank you,
Ralph Beaty

Building with green lumber | Breaktime
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
LOGGING

According to NOAA and the National Weather Service, straight line winds, which is the descending air inside a thunderstorm, can cause damage equivalent to a strong tornado and can exceed 100 MPH. These straight line winds "can be extremely dangerous to aviation." They can also fell hundred year old trees. In June of 1998, a straight-line wind blew through southeastern Lawrence County, TN. One hundred thirteen trees on the Hillhouse farm were toppled. The vast majority of these trees were oak, but there were also some walnut, cherry, poplar, sassafras, sycamore, and lindwood trees uprooted or snapped near the base. Some sweetgum trees damaged by beavers were cut and used for rafters. (Note: sweetgum lumber twists; don't process it until you are ready to use it.)

Instead of simply letting these trees die and rot, Ken, along with son Kerry, father-in-law Paul Hillhouse, and good friend/first cousin Bruce Hillhouse, decided to harvest them. The process actually sounded pretty easy: go into the woods, cut off the limbs, load the logs, take them to the sawmill, and bring home lumber. The reality consisted of a lot of hard work.

But before the first log was harvested, Bruce took Ken out to meet Jonas Miller, an Amish sawmill operator in northwest Lawrence County. Mr. Miller must be formally introduced to a new customer. If he likes the gentleman, he will provide a time to bring in logs to the sawmill. If someone just shows up with logs without the formal introduction, the logs will not be cut.

Many (most?) of the trees did not fall in a flat, open area. Just getting to some of them was half the challenge. Once a viable tree was identified and the extraneous limbs removed, the log was measured then cut into usable lengths (8 ft., 10 ft., 12 ft., or 16 ft. lengths). These cut logs then had to be pulled off the hillsides using a tractor and chain. a cant-hook was used to turn the logs and maneuver them into place. Then, using the boom on the tractor, the logs were lifted onto Randy Hillhouse's 20-foot sided trailer. All logs had to be loaded facing the same direction. The trailer would hold approximately 7 large logs or as many as 11 smaller ones. Once loaded, the trailer would be hooked to the tractor which would pull it out of the valley. Once pulled up the hill on Sugar Creek Road, the trailer would be disconnected from the tractor and connected to Paul's F150 truck for the ride through town.

Loading logs on the trailer

Trailer load of boards.

At the Miller sawmill, Jonas' children would take pity on the old men (ages 47 and 55) and help unload the logs. These tiny children could move those logs like they were pick-up sticks, lining them up to go through the saw.

The saw itself was powered by a diesel engine - the only "mechanical" item used by the Amish. Unusable slabs would be loaded onto a lorry, and draft horses would be used to haul the slabs away. The good lumber would be put on a trolley and moved to a staging area away from the saw. Lumber would then have to be loaded onto the trailer, taken back to the farm, and unloaded piece by piece. A full load of lumber (enough to build a small shed) cost approximately $30 - not counting time, diesel for the tractor, and gas for the truck.

Our first building effort using green lumber was the barn. We have since built a tool shed, added onto the barn, and have enough lumber sawed to build yet another barn. Bruce added a two-story addition to his house. Scrap lumber was used to build a shelter for the billy pen and to build feed stands. This was recycling at it's finest.
Logging to build barns
 

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performing monkey
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Please try and not think neo modern building technique. This barn is mortices and tenoned together. The components are not 2X4's or 2x6's but huge beams.
as are the floors, walls, and roof?...

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why not just use the forms and pour it all when you build your "castle"?
 

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Band mills are slow. They do a great job of cutting logs. Ive had a band mill and i didnt like it, mainly because it was too slow. I sold it and bought an old circular mill ( an 01 Frick) It saws about 7 to 10 times faster than a band mill.
Using green lumber is not as bad as most make it out to be. If you look back to how it was done in the past it worked just fine. Back then homes were framed ( balloon Framing) and sheathed then set for a season to cure out. after it was cured then the interiors were done. if there was any bad warping of lumber it was then replaced. for barns or sheds nail it up green and let it dry standing, there will be shrinkage but for a barn its ok. Ive built several barns and sheds using lumber that was growing just a few days before it was nailed up. ( cut it one day sawed it the next nailed it up on the following day. )
A few things to remember on sawing your own logs. 1) a crooked log makes a crooked board. Its true that the saw will saw straight through the log but where it saws in and out of the grain line it will bow. 2) beams always need to be made from the center of the log. By having the heart of the log in the center of the beam it will stay straight, get your boards from where you square up your beam. One log one beam. I cant say this enough. 3) properly stacking the lumber and allowing it to air dry a little will minimize shrinkage. Three months air drying in summer months boards will be 75% dry and 90% of the shrinkage will occur during that time. Stack boards with air spaces to allow drying.
 
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