Anyone doing hugelkultur?

Discussion in 'Gardening and Agriculture' started by zombieresponder, Mar 2, 2013.

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  1. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    For anyone that doesn't know: http://www.richsoil.com/hugelkultur/

    I've been thinking on building a couple of these for a while and couldn't figure out where to get enough suitable wood to make it worthwhile. As it turns out, a pipeline is coming through one of the neighbor's properties and he's been busy cutting and moving trees. I came home with a 5x10 trailer load of small pecan limbwood and will be going back for a ton more. Guess we finally have something to do with all the dirt from having our back pond cleaned out.
     
  2. majmill

    majmill Well-Known Member

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    Well my attempt is going to be small time! I cleared a bunch of brush from the side yard and piled it in a ditch. Now I'm waiting for my SIL to bring me a truck load of mulch from the dump. I'm anxious to see if anything will come of it!
     

  3. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    Interesting ... but no ...
     
  4. cowboyhermit

    cowboyhermit Supporting Member

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    I was just reading up on it this winter, makes a quite a bit of sense, at least in some situations. We have done quite similar things before with good results, but not really intentionally designed in this regard, I had never heard of this as far as I know before about a year ago.
    Our land is very hilly, hardly a flat spot around, this looks like an efficient way to do a bit more terracing and really utilize the water :D
     
  5. Magus

    Magus Scavenger deluxe

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    We use mounds of wood chips we get from the local tree removal service.
     
  6. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    You would probably get more benefit if you combined this with swales.
     
  7. cowboyhermit

    cowboyhermit Supporting Member

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    Good point, swales look really good but not so easy for us.
    The places I am wanting some terraces have only a few inches of really good soil, then it is solid clay, tough digging.
    The hills aren't that steep and we don't get ton's of rainfall here yet we 99% don't water anything:)
    In the past I have built terraced beds with logs for instance, right on top of the grass, filling in the log frame with dirt to bring it level. This worked very well but takes a lot of soil to make level. We have more than we need thanks to 100yrs of cow manure and also slough bottoms but it is a lot of work to haul it. So I am thinking of using something more like this with a mound of logs and also trying to build beds like I have before but using logs to form more of the bulk. We have partially filled beds with wood before, but out of laziness not planning:D
     
  8. Wellrounded

    Wellrounded Supporting Member

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    I use a similar method for low feeders in new garden beds. For gross feeders like vegetables this method will not generate enough food. It's fantastic for reafforestation projects and riparian zones.
     
  9. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    I'm hoping to get them all built this year. I will probably plant mostly perennials and things that don't look like food. I don't expect any production since the wood is mostly still green and will be pulling a lot of nitrogen out of the soil. Not having to bend over to pick stuff will be a huge improvement. :beercheer:
     
  10. Woody

    Woody Woodchuck

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    Never seen that before! Looks interesting to try but I do not have a lot of ‘scrap’ wood around. When I cut a tree for firewood I take it down to branches the size of a pencil, makes for no kindling splitting. Perhaps I can find some wood to sacrifice to give this a try, maybe scrounge in the neighbors woods.
     
  11. twiggie

    twiggie The end is extremely nigh

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    I've been doing some reading and really want to try this.
     
  12. sgtrunningfool

    sgtrunningfool Well-Known Member

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    I am going to try this but instead of mounding it like traditional hugel, I am going to do woody beds. Basically dig into the ground and bury the wood then place compost and soil over the top.
     
  13. zombieresponder

    zombieresponder random gibberish

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    Figured I'd post an update. I've got some wood cut, hauled, and about 30 ft of bed piled. I've got another big stack of wood that I need to move and stack for beds. Bought another chainsaw two days ago and it seems to have sped up my cutting a little. Still have a lot of wood to cut. If I remember, I'll take a few pics of everything that has been cut or will be cut.
     
  14. *Andi

    *Andi Supporting Member

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    Look forward to hearing about it!
     
  15. Enchant18

    Enchant18 Well-Known Member

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    Zombieresponder was wondering how it worked out and if you planted any trees in it?
    Within the next two weeks we will be creating a couple of very large ones with timber that had fallen due to fire. I plan to seed as soon as weather permits. Hope you had good luck!
     
  16. biobacon

    biobacon Track Layer

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    I am doing it around the edges of my yard. Each year I have added to it and will continue to do so until I have enough of a mound to terrace and then I am going to put in patato beds like I saw when I was in Peru. I figure it will take about another 5 years as Im going. At least that's the plan.
     
  17. Wanderer0101

    Wanderer0101 Well-Known Member

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    Please keep providing updates. I've got lots of information on this and really want to try it.
     
  18. Enchant18

    Enchant18 Well-Known Member

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    My concern is planting trees on an area that will eventually settle. Has anyone planted any small trees or bushes on it?
     
  19. HardCider

    HardCider Well-Known Member

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    several people around us are doing it. I was thinking of trying it with mushroom spawn, rotten wood and manure