Anybody ever used Kyocera Solar panels?

Discussion in 'Energy & Electricity' started by HELIXX, Mar 14, 2011.

  1. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 14, 2011
  2. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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  3. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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  4. Nadja

    Nadja Well-Known Member

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    I have 14 of them. Since I live totally off grid, how can I help you out ?
     
  5. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    Do you run batteries?
    Can you run a 3 HP table saw?
     
  6. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    Helixx,

    Those light bulbs say they use an E27 socket.

    As I recall, that's not a standard US size. A standard 110v light socket is an E26. I believe E27 may be used for higher voltage lighting (e.g. 220v lights). Basically, I don't know if you can buy regular fixtures from the store and insert these bulbs. If you've already addressed this, where are you getting your sockets?
     
  7. HELIXX

    HELIXX Well-Known Member

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    I had know idea on the sockets. I'll look at some different bulbs.
     
  8. ZoomZoom

    ZoomZoom Rookie Prepper

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    I'm looking at 12v lighting myself. I honestly don't know if there's 12v bulbs that will fit in a 110v socket. I have some old 24v DC lighting and next time I'm near it, I'm going to check the bulbs and compare the sockets to a 110v. (Basically, see if a 24v DC bulb will fit in a 110v AC socket and vise-versa).
     
  9. CulexPipiens

    CulexPipiens Still waiting for the zombies.

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    I would suspect that the sockets, among voltage differences, are not going to be compatible... this would prevent someone from accidentally putting a 12V or 24V bulb in a 110 socket and destroying it... or worse... starting a fire.
     
  10. mosquitomountainman

    mosquitomountainman I invented the internet. :rofl:

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    We have some and they're fine solar panels. Those you have listed have the old style junction boxes which work okay. They aren't as weatherproof is the only difference plus you don't have to have the special connectors to use them.

    As to what they'll run will depend on a lot of factors.
     
  11. MrSfstk8d

    MrSfstk8d Well-Known Member

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    Have to agree with MM. Running a 3HP table saw would be a stretch. If at ally, you'd have to be running it on a battery bank, and only periodically at that. Keep a close eye on the charge status. Personally, when SHTF, I'll be switching over to all manual woodwork, bow lathe, box frame saw, etc. Working on those skills now.
     
  12. CulexPipiens

    CulexPipiens Still waiting for the zombies.

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    If there's no power around, the whine of power tools might also draw a lot of unwanted attention. They wouldn't necessarily want your tools but would want whatever else you have up to and including the panels and batteries.
     
  13. Nadja

    Nadja Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I have batteries as my storage system , especially at night when of course there is no solar. As far as running a 3hp table saw, let me tell you this, I tried a 3hp rock saw, and starting it beside itself was sorta kinda ok, but the second it hits the rock, or gets a load on, the motor will stall down. It sucks the cr.. out of a system. Much to big to be able to do much of anything with. Run a gennie to do the heavy load stuff.
     
  14. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    I have a 13-watt solar panel connected to a battery-pack with 400watt inverter. The solar panel sits inside my house in a south-facing window, connected to the battery-pack charging it up.

    I have been playing with the pack for a while now - I can use my electric-comb to style my hair with it and it doesn't even pull 1-watt of power and doesn't drain the main battery at all by the time my hair is combed.

    I have used it with my blender to make blender-drinks, it pulls about 450-watt, but, doesn't shut-down the unit, so, I am still within its limits.

    I have used it to make muffins / cookies / cakes by powering my MixMaster. Heavy dough makes it bogg-down a bit, but, it works very well for cakes-batter.



    It does take the panel significant amount of time to recharge the battery-pack when I reach the bottom of the available-power, but, overall I am happy with it.

    Expanding the power capability (more batteries, bigger inverter) would really go a long way with being able to power larger pieces of equipment, but, I would loose the portability ... a toss-up there.

    Pictures below of similar solar panel and power-pack that I have (stolen off the 'net).
     

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  15. Nadja

    Nadja Well-Known Member

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    Thats really cute. But in dire time of need, will it run anything of value ? Of course not.
     
  16. CulexPipiens

    CulexPipiens Still waiting for the zombies.

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    Perhaps I'm wrong, but I don't think that's entirely his point... I would guess this is more of a learning experience and proof of concept. Plus it's portable. A roof or pole mount system might attract unwanted attention in "dire times". While a portable one could be put away until things settle down.
     
  17. The_Blob

    The_Blob performing monkey

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    :hmmm: 12 volt electric blanket can save your life & draws only 50.4W (4.2 amps) :congrat:
     
  18. Nadja

    Nadja Well-Known Member

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    Yes, it would probably run it ,,,,, for about 15 minutes. I have lived off the grid entirely for 16 years on solar and wind and started with just one 80 watt kyrocera panel and two batteries. I have learned what you can do and what you can't do , and an elec blanket is way beyound my means and always will be. My refer only draws one amp more then the blanket, and is far more important.
     
  19. NaeKid

    NaeKid YourAdministrator, eh?

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    Actually, it does very well for what it is. This one can run small electric motors (Dremel, blender, drill, etc), runs 12-volt and 120-volt lights, has a built-in air-compressor for filling tires, has a booster-cable to restart dead vehicles, can charge / run small electronic devices (laptop, cell-phones, MP3-players, I-Pad, I-Pod, etc).

    I have other solar systems that are significantly more advanced, but, none as portable as this one is. The beauty of this one is that I can use the solar panel to charge this battery-pack and "cascade" power to my other battery-packs if required (I currently have 4 battery packs, two for boosting motorbikes, one for boosting V8 motors and the last one for boosting 4-bangers).

    I also have an 80-watt panel to two batteries (like your original setup) to run my camping trailer with plans to expand that system with a 5,000 watt inverter and two more batteries and an additional 120-watt panel (for 200-watt of solar generating).

    My house-system is going to be a little more advanced - details to follow once I get my butt out of this damn city for good.