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Mobile Bug-Out-Bag-Man
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was practicing my knot tying the other day and showed my fiance how to open a padlock with a pop can. ( if you haven't heard of it i'm sure theres tons of videos on youtube). I started thinking about if there was any other just completely random, little known, skills that anyone would know.

Thanks ahead for replies.
 

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I'm an O- ISTJ Aries rat!
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I had to add automatic transmission fluid to my daughter's car recently. Of course, the port was down towards the bottom of the engine compartment, so I couldn't just open a quart and pour it in without a long necked spout.

I had a rifle cleaning rod nearby and I just positioned the end in the opening, and then drippled fluid down the length of the rod. Capillary action kept the fluid tight to the rod till it reached the bottom and went into the port. My daughter was suitably impressed of course.
 

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Mobile Bug-Out-Bag-Man
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56 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I had to add automatic transmission fluid to my daughter's car recently. Of course, the port was down towards the bottom of the engine compartment, so I couldn't just open a quart and pour it in without a long necked spout.

I had a rifle cleaning rod nearby and I just positioned the end in the opening, and then drippled fluid down the length of the rod. Capillary action kept the fluid tight to the rod till it reached the bottom and went into the port. My daughter was suitably impressed of course.
Great. Yea that's exactly what my questions about. So much of "surviving" is adapting. being able to use one thing for a completely different use. Thanks for the reply.
 

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I don't have any that would be useful during a collapse. It's too bad my grandparents passed away years ago. They lived without electricity until they were in their 30s. My grandpa farmed after he retired. He could do concrete and masonry work besides some carpentry and plumbing.
 

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Senior Member
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random household stuff, nothing necessarily valuable.
 

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Many years ago we went on a camping trip. It was the first trip of the year and the pump leathers on the coleman stove and lantern were dry. We had no spare oil and we did not even have cooking oil. I pulled the dipstick out of the truck and smeared the oil on the leathers. Problem solved. Boring solution but one that worked.

Using a rat trap as a snare.

Use a prusik knot to snug up a rope rather than cutting the rope.

Using a bungee cord in place of a door closer on the camper.

Using landscape fabric to repace a torn screen on the camper. This really works.

Using air fittings (both male and female) as a pivot. This works well. I once had a boat with two outboards. Twenty miles offshore the interconnecting link broke. Some hose clamps two air fittings and the old connecting rod, lots of cussing and bandaids later, we were in high cotton. This worked well enough to keep us fishing for three weeks untill the replacement parts arrived.

I had the air fittings for my compressor tools onboard only because we picked them up at a harbor we stayed at earlier in the week. To this day I carry two sets with me on the boat. The old joke: "You never are bitten when you have the snake bite kit handy".
 

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I have taken/am taking drafting classes in school. Figured I could help if we were able to rebuild after something happened.
 

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BillS & PartD, I think you two are underestimating yourselves.

I'll bet you are both far more capable than you think. OK, so you can't tear a radio apart to build a Cray supercomputer (dang -- I can't either), but if you can figure out how to fix a leaky or clogged drain, clean the points on the pressure switch on your water pump, or plug a hole in your car tire, then you have the basic aptitude to add to your survival skills when you need them.
 

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There are no household systems I haven't done major work on... but those are not necessarily survival skills.

We started gardening and canning.

I do have an engineering degree (and MBA), but those skills are not necessarily survival skills.

Watching after Armageddon right now... pretty scary stuff.
 

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I can fix cars (the mechanical side, not electronic), do basic household wiring, and plumbing, splice rope, train horses/dogs, basic carpentry, masonry, roofing, mig and stick welding, soldering, basic metal work, tree clearing/wood cutting with chainsaw, milk cows in a modern dairy setup, general farm work, sharpen chainsaw chains, small engine repair (I hate small engines:gaah:), fairly large scale gardening, canning, butchering, hunting, trapping, fishing, ok camp cook, used to be a small bore rifle and handgun instructor but I can still do it, reload ammo, ok but not a pro at operating dozer and backhoe, some basic medical skills, basic veterinary stuff, e.g. castrating, stitching, wound care, shots and birthing/pulling, hoof trimming. I can make a charcoal cooker (make my own charcoal). I'm an all around Jerry-rigger just 'cause I have to be sometimes to get the job done. Gotta love duck tape, wire and WD-40. Oh. Sometimes a big hammer helps a lot, too. :)

Lots of things I'd like to learn. Don't know much about curing meats the old fashioned way. Don't know much about smoking meats either. Don't know how to identify most of the weeds in my pasture/woods. Only know a few of the edible wild plants/roots out there. Can't identify safe mushrooms except morel and puffballs. Lots of things I don't know that I don't even know I don't know!:)
 

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There are no household systems I haven't done major work on... but those are not necessarily survival skills.

We started gardening and canning.

I do have an engineering degree (and MBA), but those skills are not necessarily survival skills.

Watching after Armageddon right now... pretty scary stuff.
Well........they could be survival skills IMHO. If, say, the economy crashes and you can't afford to pay someone to fix critical systems in your home, then you can do it yourself. Isn't that a survival skill? Same if your neighbor needs something fixed. You fix it in exchange for their daughter...........ahhhh, strike that. (Just adding a bit of humor:D)

Seriously, you have the skills to barter for something of value to you (like food, water, ammo, fuel, medicine, etc).

In a more desperate scenario, I'll bet your engineering education would be of tremendous value in helping you design and build things that would be extremely valuable in a post SHTF world.

Hey. If the SHTF, I hope you are my neighbor (but don't even think about the "daughter" thing lol). :beercheer:
 

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performing monkey
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I just bypassed the PassLockII security system on my 97 Buick LeSabre. I read the resistance off the key with my multimeter & then cobbled together a few resistors in series to get the correct value. I then spliced it to the ignition circuit so that now I don't ned to pay $100+ for special keys. :2thumb:
 

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Amateur
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I'm a carpenter and IT pro by trade and an automotive mechanic in my spare time. I've got quite a bit more biology to plow through but I'm ready to help people!
 

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Still waiting for the zombies.
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I'm a ... IT pro by trade ...
There's a useful skill when the power goes out! :D

Just messing with you... I earn my living in IT too. Now I just have to figure out how to transfer my server farm management skills into veggie farm skills!
 

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The only one responsible for yourself, is you!
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I know how to weld with a Mig, Tig and Torch. I've worked countless years building houses ground up with Hubby. I learned how to can foods a couple weeks ago (this is a must for any survival situation). I know how to make soap. Then the basics of fixing things in the home. Gardening.

What I'd like to learn is How to use a ham radio and get a license for it and Plant identification.
 

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Amateur
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I earn my living in IT too. Now I just have to figure out how to transfer my Farmville skills into veggie farm skills!
:D

I will admit that 2000 was the last time I officially worked in IT but the tech is impossible to get away from. I built the computer I'm using now out of junk parts myself and a buddy had laying around. I've got an old Eee 701 that starts up and shuts down faster than any other computer I've ever seen. Since January or so, I've been fooling around with a Droid X, trying different ROMs and other mods.

I've made decent headway with lock picking. I've tinkered with reloading. I've replaced various parts on Glocks and 1911s. We bought our house a little over a year ago and I've had okay luck with the things I've planted here.

I wish I knew more about electrical wiring. I can handle the basics but my comfort level is not where I want it to be.

I also want to learn more about knots. Short of tying my shoes, I don't really know any useful knots.
 

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This is small-time, but it could help someone out.

I unbolted a section of chain-link fence to make blowing leaves out from inside my pool fence easier. When time came to re-attache it, I couldn't pull it hard enough to mate up with the post. I didn't have a come-a-long that would give me the mechanical advantage I needed. I did, however, have a few tie-down straps... the kind with the hand operated "lever" to take up slack and hooks on each end. I attached one end to the loosened fence and the other around the corner and attached it to fence on that side. Cranking the lever gave me the mechanical advantage I needed and more to pull the fence back in place and hold it while I installed the bolts.
 

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YourAdministrator, eh?
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To answer the OP's post, I am a random-skill ... :2thumb:
 

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Depends on whether or not anyone needs a bartender after the fall of modern civilization. :D

I am trying to become a range instructor and/or an armorer for my department. Those skills could come in handy.

I have a basic knowledge of a myriad of different skills, but am not proficient in many of them. I feel, though, that I would rather be familiar with and competent in a lot of things than a master of only one.
 

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Nurture the creatures that live and visit your property. Bird feeder, vegetable garden, etc. The critters living under your deck or shed are a valuable source of renewable protein. Educate yourself to harvest and process for food.
 
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