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We (my spouse and me) each have an Alice Pack as a BOB and at age 72 it is getting somewhat difficult to manage for us.
I am wondering if anyone has discussed any kind of contrivance to carry the Alice along with a larger supply of water and other items.
I am looking for a rig that is lightweight and has larger diameter wheels where the whole thing can be broken down and packed if need be, by someone in tight quarters.
Golf bag karts seem to be too heavy and cumbersome although they will haul the weight.
I am thinking more about an aluminum/titanium frame with 20-26" lightweight bicycle wheels (front wheels) with fast disconnect axles.
As we spend most of our time in the southwest, water is VERY important.
Has anyone seen anything like this or have any positive suggestions
 

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Sourdough - that is a good idea. Another idea would be to build your own cart. Around here, people will build a two-wheeled cart out of a matched pair of front bicycle forks and the wheels, weld to a frame and then attach some plywood to the frame. See picture below of one such sample in use.
 

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Mountainbike - the VC carried an amazing amount of stuff over rough terrain by bicycle.
Not "packable" but still highly mobile. Larger panniers can carry water jugs.
 

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Mountain bike - the VC carried an amazing amount of stuff over rough terrain by bicycle.
Not "packable" but still highly mobile. Larger panniers can carry water jugs.
Mountain Bike and a trailer is even better. They also make side cars for bicycles. I just bought a 29" Mt. Bike and was going to install racks on the front and back, but just the racks were $300.00 and I can get a good trailer for that price that will haul 100 pounds.
 

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You might be looking the wrong direction at the 'Issue'...

If I may suggest this,
Instead of worrying about hauling large amounts of POTABLE water,
Think about a filter so you can condition water on the spot instead to transporting 'Cleaned' water with.

I'm not sure about your situation, if you have to haul water everyday anyway, that is a STUPID idea,

But if you are concerned with a 'Bug Out' bag, then take a water filter and treat water as you find it.

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As for transporting water, there really isn't a good way,
They haven't invented 'Dehydrated Water' yet, and if they do, I won't be able to figure out what to add! :rolleyes:

I once put instant coffee in a microwave and went back in time! :nuts:

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If you have available water close, use SMALL size tubing to siphon,
that keeps the weight of the water column small and it doesn't take a big pump to draw it,
Collect over time and you should have plenty.

If you want to haul water in a bail out pack, then take CONTAINERS and a filter, get water where you find it, and don't try to pack a week worth of water at a time.

Depending on where you live, water usually isn't hard to find, but being able to filter it is paramount when you do!
Not everyone wants to boil water, I know I don't want smoke a lot of times when I find water,
So I carry a 'Filter Straw' at the minimum and water purification tabs for emergencies...
I refill quite often when I'm hunting in the big rocks, and I drink my fill of filtered but NON-Chemically treated water through the straw to keep my exposure to the treatment chemicals to a minimum...

Having containers for 'Raw' and 'Potable' water is a good idea,
They are light, allow you to filter when you need to, or you can boil when you set up camp and can have a fire to cut down on chemicals you have to use.
This also allows you to use the 'Raw' water for washing up and you don't waste time/resources filtering water that doesn't have to be...

Just some ideas from an old bush rat that hunts/camps WAY too much!
Take it for what you paid for it.
 

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Mountain Bike and a trailer is even better. They also make side cars for bicycles. I just bought a 29" Mt. Bike and was going to install racks on the front and back, but just the racks were $300.00 and I can get a good trailer for that price that will haul 100 pounds.
The bike trailer isn't hauling 100 pounds, YOU are.
 

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did anyone even read what the OP said, they're 72 and at that age you don't jump on a bike carring a back pack,or do you pull a loaded garden cart around.
 

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did anyone even read what the OP said, they're 72 and at that age you don't jump on a bike carring a back pack,or do you pull a loaded garden cart around.
My grandpa is 94 and is still working his large garden, shovelling, haulin' stuff around in a wheel-barrow, canning and freezing the produce, turning the berries into pies and jams. My dad tells me that grandpa is slowin' down a bit, his garden-space is only 1 1/2 acres now instead of the 3 acres he used to garden, but, he still has the berries along the embankment that he walks up and down picking away. He does double-check for bears before he picks the berries, he doesn't like to be surprised any more, he says that its a little hard on his heart .. :eek:
 

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did anyone even read what the OP said, they're 72 and at that age you don't jump on a bike carring a back pack,or do you pull a loaded garden cart around.
And your suggestion for them is ... ? Did you read the post and see what kinds of qualifications they put down? Large wheels? Can be broken down for storage? Some game carts, garden carts and bike trailers fit this description. I know someone in his 80's that still rides his bicycle.
 

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Age affects people differently. My 77 year old father still works his garden, and mows & tends his three acre yard. I cannot EVER remember him on a bike - I doubt he ever rode one in his life! He says he doesn't trust his balance enough to ride a motorcycle either. But, he can sure push a wheelbarrow load of anything for a good day's work! He's an ornery and cantankerous old coot. ;)
BUT.... he'll NEVER leave his property, even if a Cat Five is coming. Just his way. It's HIS property and by dang he'll live and die there.......
Got a lot of that in me too - but a Cat Five will make me pack the van and utility trailer and head north a bit temporarily tilit passes. I WILL be coming back and rebuilding as necessary. I have already planned out the possibility of hauling water from the nearby lakes - and it does not involve bicycles or push carts. ;)
 

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I have an Uncle, he is 81 or 82, he roller skates every Friday night!!
 

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I'm 70 and walk over 5 miles every day, but i know many around here in their 50s that can't even walk un the hill to my house.

getting back to the original post, my suggestion is get a mule.
 
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