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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Youtube video link.

As shown, 2:50 into video. A fire, any. Will melt the snow present. So everyone and everything. Will become soaking wet, in real life, most likely. Almost guaranteed, in real life. Unless very careful, to shovel out, all the snow, and dry everything out, carefully, as not to melt synthetics, or damage nature material. You, and all others present, in such a situation, will be, in a real life, fighting for your life, in a real wilderness survival situation. Where it is really possible, that none, will survive the night. Or need amputations later. Don't bother, I guess then, with trying to dry out down. Unless you have no choices, at all. Like to merely, to stay alive then. Have a horrific camping experience anyway. Be put-off, of ever camping again. Being wet and cold.

People, start to think wrong, and make poor decisions. When they get cold. To the point, they can not, even tell you, there own name anymore. Or respond, in any way, to you. Never watched the whole video yet. A good lesson, for all to heed anyway, regardless. Carbon monoxide poisoning is another real possibility. You get headaches, and start making poor decisions too, and then, go into a coma, and then die. Need proper ventilation. This stuff, like having a fire, (not suppose to) inside a tent. In my opinion. Is all based upon the past, when people had breathable canvas tents (major air circulation), and wood stoves in them, to stay warm and alive. They had no choices, at all.

This person may know this, as I wrote above, but is not fully, consciously, realize, this point I made. I knew this, and know this, and did not, fully, and consciously, realize how import this is, until I watched this video. Kind of just understood, and you just, do it.

Spruce bows can be placed as a floor, in the tents. Eventually, and especially, if you shovel all the snow out, to the ground, and a few feet from the tent itself too, outside. It should dry out. About 6 inches of tree branches, (compressed) with the needles facing downwards. Pine well smells like pine, and will become a bit (lots) sticky, and gummy. In the winter for example, or when dry, in the summer, and you grab onto a pine branch. It will be like grabbing onto barbed wire. It hurts a lot, and some pine needles, will break off, and be stuck into your skin. Kind-of like, porcupine quills, stuck in your skin with-out the barbs, of course. May still break off the tips some what, deep inside your hand, or fingers, or both. Pull straight out.

If you get whipped across your face with a branch like that. You will most likely, seriously hurt your eyes, and they me be permanently damaged. So safety glasses, with high visibility lanyards on them, and gloves, are critical gear to have, for safety purposes. And will most likely save you from finding out what could have happened to one or both eyes. Pretty well guarantee it. At least once. All gets hanged on a tree branch, to make them easier to spot. When tired mistakes happen, things get forgotten, etc. Taken off for sleeping, etc. Remember getting, and cutting wood and such. Hit the tree with the back of your axe to knock the snow off. Or else the snow will get down you back. That is what it does. Branched may also break off then, and hurt, or kill you, so be careful. Watch for falling branches. No one in your way to back off fast, etc. Clear way, to get out of the way, of a falling branch.

I have personally had snow blindness, was driving a snowmobile, while crossing the ocean basically, (large water body) on the shoreline, a few miles out. In site of land still. I think it was spring time, or maybe the fall. I remember, the sun was low, as always, in Canada, in the winter time. The top layer of snow had melted somewhat, and recrystallized, and was glittery. Sparkling. Kind of like, seeing a welder doing welding, I realize now. But you do not know, slower to hurt your eyes. It took like a hour or so, and then it started to hurt, a lot, burning pain. Every time I blinked my eyelids, it felt like someone, was scrapping sandpaper across my eyes. After we got to the cabin, my eyes just burned and burned, for hours afterwards. Put a wet cold cloth across my eyes. Like putting cold water on a burned finger, basically. Felt like that. Afterwards, I always, and we always, had lanyard-ed sun glasses on, while driving a snowmobile.

I had good mitts. I almost lost one of my mittens, in the blowing wind. My mitt was blowing away fast. I got it back though. If I did not get it fast, it would have disappeared into the distance, as the falling snow, which is commonplace there, would have hide the mitt from my eye-site as it drifted away. Did not realize how cold it was, until then. Had good warm gear on. Just taking a glove or mitt off, in the blowing wind, will get some snow in it, which melts in it. That is the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
It is super hard to start a fire in the wind. Dig a hole, pile up snow in front, etc. You could have a 1000 matches and freak out, it takes hundreds of matches to start a single fire, in the wind. Snow too. Dig down, to the ground.
 

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Come fall,winter, or spring you sweat at night and the insulation of your sleeping bag will not work as well even if it's one of the hollow fibers. So, what kept you warm on the first night won't work as well a few nights later, Do your best to open your bag and air /dry it out. Wool is great when dry and will work when wet, and will shed a lot of moisture-however, it takes a lot of time to dry out! Natural down is great stuff as ling as it is dry. Wet it's worthless. Breathable waterproof outer gear stops a lot of precipitation and the wind too.
My brother always had cold feet. As he got older, he came to realize his boots and wool socks were too good , so they in combination with wool socks left his feet sweating. Now , unless snowmobiling, he sticks to leather waterproof boots and a pair of wool socks.
For myself, leather boots with a membrane and 200 gram Thinsulate insulation with polyproplyene socks topped with medium weight wool are "the cat's meow" until the high teens (Colorado high country to Minnesota north and south, to Wisconsin north). below that, I'm wearing my Sorel Pacs with light and the medium wool socks. For under wear I like marino wool- duo fold, Cabela's MTO medium and heavy. A fleece jacket is good. I've been known to throw on a vest under the fleece when its super cold. Atop that, I like jackets and coats with both zippers and snaps. Snaps work well if you start to get warm, you choose how much is sealed up. If you start to overheat take of your hat or remove your hood. Mittens are warmer than gloves- they keep your fingers together. When you see your deer bite the end of your mitten and pull it off. My dad alway said, "If you have it you can take it off, but- - -,"
If your hunting and the temps drop below a minus twenty below and your vehicle batteries won't turn over, pull the batteries, put them inside where its warm - go hunting- and when you return take the newest battery and put it back in. connect the to a second battery with your jumper cables(REMEMBER RED TO RED AND BLACK TO BLACK) and start vehicle one. Disconnect the jumper cables and put in battery number two, reconnect the jumper cables one to the running vehicle and the to the second vehicle and start the second vehicle.
Butane lighters don't work too well when it's really cold. Find another way.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Now that I think about it, cloaks are high end. Like you see in movies, or TV shows sometimes. A cloak, with a big hood. Like a poncho, but open in the front. Blocks the wind from behind, and much more breathable, than a poncho. So a waterproof cloak, might be interesting in wet conditions. Of course a poncho is better in pouring rains, and such.

Heard talk, about people, using a cloak like a sleeping bag too, on forums. Wrapped in there cloak, when going to sleep.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
In wet falling snow, I now would want a breathable winter jacket, with a waterproof cloak (another layer), with a big hood, over my jacket. (Open and highly breathable at the front). In those conditions, with wet pouring snow, which I have been in a lot in the past. Even waiting by the bus stop, to, go to school in the winter time. Where the snow, makes you soaking wet, standing up even, and it is still cold. (freezing cold and wet). Well, I think, a cloak, would be awesome now.

Light fluffy falling snow. Can become wet to, when on you. On your winter jacket.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Cloaks, maybe in some ways, are lost traditional knowledge.

Cloaks in pouring rain, or wet snowfall, would just look like someone using a poncho. If you can close the cloak fully, in the front.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
This video has a wood stove in it. A problem many have mentioned about, with wood stoves is, the fire burning out at night. Out in the mourning. All wood stoves I ever uses, had a way to control precisely, the air the fire received. You could turn down the amount of oxygen the burning wood received at night. So the wood burned slower. Many times I did this. 1000s of times. Most of the time, there was still embers, glowing in the mourning. A big wood stove though. Big wood stoves give off, big heat. Lots of metal to heat up too. Need some type of air blower, that turns on when hot. To blow hot air around.

A bolt with a big head was used to control air intake. Under the big head of the adjustable bolt was air intake holes or slots. By turning the insulated bolt head. You could open or close the air supply for the fire precisely. Turn it completely off, I guess, in my case. Never did that though.

Could screw the oversized blot head completely flush, with the front of stove, and completely cover, the air intake holes, of stove.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Can hear the stove roaring, when close by it. The air being drawn in.

Wood stoves are awesome, when you have one. Need wood too, of course.

When you have a wood stove in a tent or cabin. It is really hard, not to rely on the stove, to stay warm. It is so nice.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
If you want a wood stove for your home, and you want it in the basement. Heat rises after all. You can have some type of hatch installed, on the side of your home. (6X6) or (8x8) and man head high, well deep. Man head high, to stand comfortably in, at ground level. Sticking out from the side of your home, like 6 inches, above ground level. Water protection, or higher as needed. Metal hatch, tough. Insulated on inside. Bla bla bla. A lid on top. Like a box lid, that fits over hatch opening. Want to pry open, have to pry from underneath, and close to ground.

Put lots of gravel around hatch. Pack down like concrete eventually. Mixed gravel.

The hatch needs to be able to go more than 90 degrees high. So that it will not, slam down, on someones' head. Lock somehow to. Like with a pad lock you control, by using. So no serious accidents happen. Like the lid, slamming down, on someones head. You do that, lock it, in place. Kind-of like, leaning the hatch, against a wall, and locking the hatch, in place.

The same padlock, used to lock the lid in place, so no one can get inside. Can be used, to secure the hatch in place, while in use. Make sure, whomever piles the wood in, tells you afterwards, when they are done, so you can close, and lock, the hatch.

If any issues should ever arise. You know for a fact what was done and not done. To a great degree anyway.

If the hatch, can not go back far enough, to be locked in place. You can use a steel cable, or chain, attached to the hatch, to reach back, to securely attach it, to a wall, or whatever.

No stairs, unless, you want some, or need some. Normally drop wood straight down, and fill up with firewood. Kind of like, when you see movies of people, going into a cellar, when a tornado is about to strike. If you have steps there, wood is going to go flying (ballistic) inside your basement, and damage people, and or property (routinely). A piece of wood, will still go ballistic, sometimes without any steps. It just does that.

Have no one in basement basically. Children must be locked out of basement. I say again, the wood will go "ballistic" sometimes. Like a bouncing ball, in some ways, with only one bounce. When you first see that happen. You will probably be shocked. You will be thankful, no one got hit, by that wood, because, you will think, they would have been seriously injured, or dead, if hit, in the head.

Do a cord of wood, at a time, basically. (cord wood). Young children, do stupid things, like we all have, as teens, and such. Perfectly safe, when you take basic precautions. I guess, you can use some type of tough door, you can close, or something. Maybe cargo netting attached on hooks, you let down several feet, and close to floor. Whatever. Redundant safety devices.

Made of concrete. Can lock it, from the inside. Can have, one or two alarm switches installed, on the inside, to let you know, when it's opened up. Have it locked from the outside too, so people can see, it's locked. Toss wood into it, lots too. Then easy to stack up, lots of wood downstairs, against a wall to shelf height. Instead of moving wood, up and down the basement steps. Bypass the stairs.

When I see, movies and homes, with the traditional "sit on the rug wood stoves". That is not a wood stove to me, but a wood burning furnace. Most likely, not very good, for even heating a room, but to look nice. Which is what, it is for, and does a good job at. You can cook, on a wood stove, and will help a lot, in heating you home (lower power bill). Not made to look pretty, but be utilitarian, for daily usage. Nice, in it's own way too. The cat and dog will love it, in the winter time. Especially in a cabin. Will sit sometimes by the fire. Dog anyway. If you do to.
 
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