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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I understand that some LDS churches have groups and classes to help their members prep. I would love to participate with them, and support them in their efforts, and even become part of their network (and I would bring a lot to the table--I've been at this for some time). But, I wonder if I would not be welcomed since I am not LDS.

If I showed up at an LDS church (I drive by one often) and inquired about these prepping groups, would they look at me warily, and politely send me on my way?...would they be worried about me because I was an outsider? I certainly would understand if they did. Would they want me to declare an openness to converting (which I would not do, since it would be a lie)? Or, would they let me participate as a friendly outsider...perhaps as a form of community outreach?

It certainly would be an awkward thing to do, asking to participate while not wanting to commit to their faith. But, I would not want to mislead them in any way by acting like I was interested in converting when I am not. At the same time, we have some common values, and I would like to safely expand my prep network beyond my immediate family.
 

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Tacitus, I have done this. They are open to outsiders because you have stepped forward as someone who might want to convert.

Some of their wards (what they call a church group) have preparedness conferences and regular classes. A friend of mine, LDS, is the preparedness person at her ward. They will probably put you in touch with that person in their ward. A group of wards is called a stake. They do preparedness expos as well.

They always want me. I am a Christian, a prepper, into genealogy. I have more interest and progress in some of their noteworthy ideas than some of their own do. I just tell them I do not believe their doctrine, because I don't.
 

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Honestly, I hate to say it, but my church is locked unless they are holding a meeting of done sort. But the biggest way outdoor stay in contact, as with anything is facebook. If you don't use it or your local stake/ward hasn't set one up, then click through lds.org to your churches page.

They are very open to outsiders. We don't require any pledging, just be respectful. As in no cursing, rudeness, etc and you'll always be welcome. Our ward just held a plum jam class last week. And there are people in every ward who are known to specialize in various things.

They will ask you about joining/attending services, but if you're honest and forthright, then there is no issue. I dated, got engaged to, and married my husband before we even talked about me converting. Even then, I didn't for almost a year and I could have chosen not to and know people who never have.
 

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I attended several LDS classes and was welcomed by everyone. The dates when those classes were scheduled were published in the religion section of the local newspaper and everyone was invited to attend. While the instructors openly stated that preparedness was an important part of their faith, they made no attempt to convert visitors when I was there.

In Washington state, when the first young missionaries stopped their bikes at my house one typical rainy day, I told them I was not interested in religious discussions, but invited them in out of the weather. We talked about lots of things...family, girlfriends, sports, and yes, even gardening and prepping...everything young men might be interested in or had been taught was important. Over the years, my house became a place where they knew they could stop, rest, warm up, and have friendly conversation, but that conversion wasn't on the agenda.

I have the highest respect for the way LDS people deal with those of us outside their faith, and their willingness to share their common sense ideas for facing daily life and preparing for the future. Most importantly, they have also respected my views.

As others said, just treat them with respect and friendliness, and I'd be very surprised if anyone will give you a bad time.
 

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... In Washington state, when the first young missionaries stopped their bikes at my house one typical rainy day, I told them I was not interested in religious discussions, but invited them in out of the weather. We talked about lots of things...family, girlfriends, sports, and yes, even gardening and prepping...everything young men might be interested in or had been taught was important. Over the years, my house became a place where they knew they could stop, rest, warm up, and have friendly conversation, but that conversion wasn't on the agenda. ...
That is the evangelistic "playbook" but it's honest and follows Biblical principles of loving people first wherever they are in their spiritual life and beliefs. The idea is that sooner or later a person will hit one of those times when they are open and in need of answers. The most likely person/people they'll go to in those times are those who are their trusted friends.

While it may be in the "playbook" it is not a gimmick. Their care and concern for others is genuine and not based on just adding another "notch" to their "gospel gun." Their care is not based on a timeline in which you'll be expected to "convert" or they will abandon their "efforts."

That's the way Christians are supposed to be with all people.
 

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I am LDS and you will be welcomed and respected. Yes, someone is likely to invite you to attend church but all you have to say is that you aren't interested in doctrine or teachings but interested in contributing and sharing knowledge and ideas with their community and learning from their classes.
 

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Last year a local LDS church held a "Preparedness Seminar" and everyone was welcome, they did "require" that you sign and I thought I'd be getting a visit from them at some later date but I was wrong.

They were all friendly, knowledgable and eager to assist with no strings attached.
 

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I'm LDS and involved with the Church's emergency preparation efforts at a local level. You'll be warmly welcomed and have a new group of friends to boot.

Yes, you will be invited to attend religious meetings...we're big on missionary work (outreach) and working to bring people into Church membership. But it's not a requirement for joining in our emergency preparation efforts. Just politely and firmly tell them you're not interested, and they'll respect that decision. One of the informal leaders in my local area is a non-member - he's been involved with our emergency preparation efforts for years.

If you go to www.providentliving.org, you can learn about some of the Church's viewpoints on self-reliance and emergency preparation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks to everyone for the awesome posts. You have given me the courage (I think) to stop by the ward (is that the right term)? I may wait until after the holidays. Things are pretty hectic for me now.
 

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Thanks to everyone for the awesome posts. You have given me the courage (I think) to stop by the ward (is that the right term)? I may wait until after the holidays. Things are pretty hectic for me now.
Yep, the local meeting house is a ward, the bigger version is a stake center and the big one is the temple. Good luck!
 

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Solar Cooker
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where I live I have known several non-LDS who have participated and contributed in the local LDS congregation's emergency preparedness programs for years and who have had no issues that I have ever been privy to.
In fact some of them are more dedicated and more engaged in this effort than some of the members and are a welcome resource in and of themselves.
 

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I know a few LDS members and make sure that I remain either neutral or on their good side. After all if society collapses and goes into free fall, a year or two later there may be more LDS survivors than anyone else. ;)
 

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I met a LDs lady and she didn't push anything on me,

Also got one of the best videos on islam from Dr. Veith. Of course catholics hate it. But it was very helpful in my study of ancient religions and such.
 

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I know a few LDS members and make sure that I remain either neutral or on their good side. After all if society collapses and goes into free fall, a year or two later there may be more LDS survivors than anyone else. ;)
Except, my LDS friend, the ward preparedness person, tells me that preparedness is something that many have little or no regard for. Some have heard it, but are just not doing a thing. They live their lives like the rest of Americans who are not preparing, or like the grasshopper, and believe that they will be able to live off of other LDS.

One time the church leader got up at one of the big conferences and asked who had this amount of food, and kept going to see that very few have what the church had asked for. This was in the day when a years supply was the guideline. Now it is 3 months worth. :eek: He had very little to say, except that if they were not listening to church counsel about this, what could he say that they would take to heart.

The other thing I have been told, and I do not know how true this is, but the demands for help from the church have risen while the support has not.

So if you know an LDS person, they may be grateful to know you and to come your way for help when SHTF.
 

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weedygarden makes a great point. The program in the LDS Church is definitely among the best. And some members are very engaged. Others not so much - Mormons have all the same human foibles that we all struggle with.
 
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