A few tips on securing your home before and after a disaster

Discussion in 'General Preparedness Discussion' started by Todays Survival Show, Nov 22, 2009.

  1. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

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    A few thoughts on protecting your home before and after the shtf.

    Seeing your enemy coming is incredibly important, and so is the ability to force your enemy into a bottleneck and slow them down.

    I think a CCTV or Aiphone system is very important in defending your castle. Aiphone is actually one of my competitors in my main line of work, but a very good one at that. It's not that expensive to install a standard three camera aiphone system, http://www.internet-security-inc.com...ucts_id=480711 They are well worth it.

    Here's a list of factors to consider when thinking of how to defend your castle:

    - Standoff space: The visible distance between your home and a perimeter of some sort (more is better).

    - Visibility: having some way to see outside without having outsiders looking in is ideal. If cameras are not possible, one way blinds or pull-downs will do.

    - Deter: Dogs, cameras, motion lights, fences, heavy locks, steel doors, bars on windows, etc.

    - Perimeter: Having a high fence is great and will give you more time to stop an intruder (shoot him). Motion detectors work great, the ones with the spotlights are even better. I've had them before, don't have them now, but they are on my Christmas list.

    - Fortify: Heavy locks, dead bolts, thick doors and longer locking hardware screws help a great deal.

    - Defend: Guns, slingshots, knives, crossbows, bats, pepper sprays, mace, tasers, traps, etc.

    - Logistics... beans, bullets and band-aids: Always maintain a 30 day supply of food and water, but some of us have a lot more than that stored. Also medical supplies, books, gear, spare batteries, etc...

    - Communication: Radios, cell phones, 2 way radios, Ham radios, CB's, hard-line phones, etc...

    - Evacuation: Have a plan to evacuate and rehearse it with your family. Establish rally points not far from your home, so you and the family can meet up later. Have a plan make sure EVERYONE knows it and practice it a few times in advance.

    - Safe-Haven: This is often overlooked, but it's a great idea to have a single room (perhaps a big closet) that is used as a safe-haven...a place where you and you family can make a last stand, your own little ALAMO so to speak. Have everything in there that you would normally keep in your regular supply stash such as guns, lots of ammo, food, water,bug out bag and communication gear. Your safe-haven should be like Ft. Knox with hard-lined doors, fresh air supply, lots of ventilation, etc. If you can't do all that, at least make sure that you have some sort of defensive cover to buy you some time while the intruders are beating on the door or when they knock it down and all crap breaks loose! Let 'em have it...unload on them! Remember it could likely be your last stand. Make it a good one. From your Safe Haven, you might finally force them away.

    Stay safe,
     
  2. TechAdmin

    TechAdmin Administrator Staff Member

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    I keep and maintain a cc camera system. good plan.
     

  3. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    All of those are great ideas, but a few are out of reach financially for some. One item I keep on hand, especially if you have a large piece of property is spools of barbed or razor wire. They can be unspooled from the end from a tractor or vehicle which leaves them semi-coiled either on the ground or near or on top of a fence. These will be hard to find after:shtf: One more obstacle for unwanted intruders to deal with, and are pretty cheap, quick and easy to deploy.
     
  4. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

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    I forgot to mention having an escape route. I was told that was something I forgot and that's a good idea, in case you're surrounded.
     
  5. almac

    almac Active Member

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  6. bunkerbob

    bunkerbob Supporting Member

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    I started with the X10 series of CCTV and light controls, the cameras are ok but do not transmit very far, and can be 'captured' by anyone who has the receiver outfit, no secure freq. and they can interfere. I still have some even with the remote robotic feature, use them in the work shop with a small TV. Now the X10 remote switches do not work with off-grid inverter systems, they do not like the modified wave forms, even the Xantrex sine wave inverters are not good enough, believe me I've been on the phone with both the inverter co. and X10 to resolve, I'm going to put these on Ebay soon. I've now gone to all hardwired CCTV infra red cameras with IR leds for night viewing, good up to about 50 ft. with a built in mike, these feed into my house system then to a video sequencer that is fed to all TVs in the house on a select channel.
     
  7. Todays Survival Show

    Todays Survival Show Survival and Handgun Podcaster

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    Something else very important is a CO detector. Not necessarily a device that protects your home, but it protects you. More deaths occur from CO poisoning that what you hear about. There are good ones on the market like these,
    Product Information Page - Linear LLC, that are wireless and easy to install. You can get them monitored if you wish or they can be connected to a home alarm system.

    Don't forget about the tasteless, ordorless, killer gas, carbon monoxide.
     
  8. dahur

    dahur Well-Known Member

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    I've used X-10 for over 15 years, and still have great success with the modules.
    However, their cameras, in opinion, aren't very good. I've tried them, and they were always a problem. I would not recommend them.
    I installed a 26x optical/12x digital PTZ dome camera on my house last year. This is a low crime area in southern NM, but anything can happen anywhere. The cameras are a deterrent.
    Another system I have that works well is Lukwerks video over powerline cameras. All you need is an AC plug to plug the camera into, and an AC by your computer to receive the signal, and USB it into your PC. Very simple, no hassles, and best of all, NO WIRES TO RUN. Youtube has videos of them in action. Reasonably priced.

    Microseven security dome camera
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    View from dome camera
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    Dome camera night time shot
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