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Old 02-15-2012, 09:43 PM   #11
geoffreys7
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Im wondering if anyone makes a large hatchet/axe where you could change the handles on the same head to convert it from an axe to a hatchet??



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Old 02-16-2012, 12:15 AM   #12
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I'm very pro axe or hatchet. I usually have one under the back seat of the truck and that light weight tomahawk my wife got me for my birthday goes to the woods with me about every time. I like the wooden handles myself. Walking around antique stores I've noticed I see quite a few old axes with home made handles. They may not be as pretty or ergonomic as factory handles but I like knowing I can make my own replacement if I needed too



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Old 02-16-2012, 02:26 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraM37 View Post
I was looking at the Estwings at home depot. Looked sturdy and they had two sizes. I think 26" and 19" or thereabouts. Might get one of each but want to see what others might be recommended here and then going shopping.
I like the longer handle. The other size is too short for an axe and too long for a hatchet.

Steve
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Old 02-16-2012, 03:10 AM   #14
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If you do choose a full length axe or maul (even for shorter versions, now that I think about it), I would recommend those with plastic-over-fiberglass core handles. I have an 8lb maul (hammer-head with axe, can be driven with sledge like a wedge if it sticks in wood) for splitting, and a 4lb single-face axe. The maul was purchased in 1988, and I've sharpened the axe-head a few dozen times and re-surfaced the hammer-head a few times. I can't count how many times that maul has deflected violently from striking a knot...hard enough to make me glad for gloved hands, because the shock was quite severe...maul is still kicking hard after all these years and the handle seems impervious to the rigors of occasional abuse...never worked loose to this day. The axe is only a couple years old, but is yielding the same rugged, indestructible qualities, so far. I doubt that a flying or dropped axe with a fiberglass handle would result in a broken handle, as is almost a guarantee with wood.

Growing up on a farm, we had a hickory-handled double-faced axe and that was a never-ending chore to be sure the handle wedges were buried tightly, and/or adding wedges, so the handle wouldn't work out of the head...I have the same problem with wood handled double-face hammers, framing hammers and sledges.

Just saying, wood handles aren't as reliable for long-term in many applications, at least without taking extra measures to assure you (or a by-stander) don't get a face full of iron. The fiberglass cores seem to be maintenance-free, and aren't damaged by being left out in the weather...though you may have rusty heads to polish.

Bug-out or bug-in, my fiberglass will be here for me.

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Old 02-16-2012, 03:22 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraM37 View Post
I was looking at the Estwings at home depot. Looked sturdy and they had two sizes. I think 26" and 19" or thereabouts. Might get one of each but want to see what others might be recommended here and then going shopping.
I have a high opinion of Estwing tools. Their steel is excellent. I come from a house building background, and I have beat the claws of their hammers into a groove and stomped the handle several times with my foot to pry something apart. Their axes are made out of the same steel. I have the larger axe myself, and treat it with reverence, as a high quality tool. Remember the flood at Albert Pike, that made national news? I found a small Estwing hatchet stuck in a tree in the woods there, many years ago. Albert Pike is not far from here. I did find an old Hudson's Bay hatchet that I had put on a shelf in the shop, kinda re discovered it today.
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Old 02-19-2012, 05:35 PM   #16
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I have one of the Fiskers medium sized axes. Before I bought it I had looked at some of the other well known brands, but was disappointed to see most were made in...... China. At least the Fiskers is forged in Finland. I imagine it is darn near unbreakable! Takes a great edge and sharpens easily. It small enough for your vehicle, but may be a bit large for humping in the woods with it. Besides, the "sheath" (if you want to call it that) is some plastic arrangement with a carry handle. Kinda sucks, actually.

I have a Weterlings small hunter's axe as well. The head is about hatchet sized, but with a longer hickory handle. Just right for trekking off into the wilderness with. It, too, is hand forged, and is of very high quality.

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Old 02-21-2012, 11:34 AM   #17
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I had one of the Gerber "camp axes", which to me was really a hatchet. It served me well for over a decade, splitting wood for dozens of camp-fires and some duty as a fine-tuner to get wood ready for the stove. The only damage it took was if I let it be used in the communal woodpile, or if someone else was on fire duty. Used properly, it barely showed any wear. Some lucky fool now has it after it got left in N.Georgia. i almost shed a tear over that. Now I have a Marble's tool, as yet untested. We shall see.


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Old 02-21-2012, 05:24 PM   #18
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IAWoodsman's youtube video review of the Cold Steel Trail Hawk was pretty informative.

I like a pack axe much more than large knives or saws. Much more efficient use of the weight and versatile. And the Cold Steel would be a lot cheaper to lose than a Granfors Bruks... and cheaper to have multiples.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pvv97vPLHk


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Old 02-21-2012, 05:50 PM   #19
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A full set of Pioneer tools should be in your jeep, regardless of your BOB/GHB/GOOD gear, if you plan on going off roading.

For BOB/GHB/GOOD bags, it's all personal preference. I carry a 'hawk and sierra folding saw with my GHB, a machete AND the 'hawk/sierra saw with my Go-Gear.

I personally like a full sized axe with wooden handle because of easy replacement for any chopping duties around the house.
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Old 02-21-2012, 06:29 PM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by md1911 View Post
I use a tommahawk it will cut wood as well as a good weapon
Hey MD, What kind of hawk do you recomend for throwing, I look at them @ the Log Cabin Store, They have several types. Dixie Gun Works also sells them. Any recomendations?

I seem to pick up axes & hatchets at sales and have several full length, 3/4 length and hatchets.

Don't forget a couple of 9" mill files for keeping them sharpened.


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