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Old 10-23-2008, 10:35 PM   #1
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Default Wood Not to Burn

I've researched the topic with really mixed results. Mostly get opinions. Are there any large trees you are NOT supposed to burn in indoor fireplaces?



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Old 10-23-2008, 11:31 PM   #2
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Cedar Trees give off a poisonous gas and should never be burned inside the home or shop.



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Old 10-24-2008, 12:38 AM   #3
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Any kind of evergreen puts off more creosote, which increases the chance of a flash fire. Burn hardwoods if possible.

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Old 10-24-2008, 01:14 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DuckA View Post
Any kind of evergreen puts off more creosote, which increases the chance of a flash fire. Burn hardwoods if possible.
Very true, the only time we use to burn a pine type wood would be in a real hot fire, but then you are still taking a chance with creosote build up
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Old 10-25-2008, 12:25 AM   #5
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Never ever burn Oleader's either! I know for sure those are toxic.

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Old 11-14-2008, 01:46 AM   #6
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Anything that is pressure treated, painted, or stained, or the like, should not be burned.

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Old 11-14-2008, 03:18 AM   #7
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No cedar trees do not give off a poisonous gas. If they did I've have already been dead years ago. Cedar actually makes a very good fire wood. Here is a really good listing of firewoods

Colestin Rural Fire District - Firewood - Types, Fuel Values and Ratings

and a firewood Q&A
Firewood q&a archive

Quote:
Can I burn Cedar?

Can you safety burn cedar wood? We just cut down several cedar trees and were wondering if it is safe to burn.
Frank

Frank,
Sure you can burn it, but it depends on what you burn it in and how you go about it. Cedar makes just about the best natural kindling you can get. It splits easily, lights easily and burns hot. It also spits and crackles so it is not good in an open fireplace. Also, if you are burning it in an open fireplace, you might find it doesn't last long. If you burn it in a stove, you might find it makes a smoky fire if you turn down the air. The thing is, when heated, cedar releases its combustible gases (smoke) very quickly, so it needs a lot of air during its peak release period. Cedar works well for quick fires in spring and fall to take the chill off.
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Cedar Trees give off a poisonous gas and should never be burned inside the home or shop.
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Old 11-14-2008, 03:32 AM   #8
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What about hackberry?

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Old 11-14-2008, 03:38 AM   #9
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As for the Creosote build up, it doesn't matter what woods you burn, ALL woods have a chance of depositing creosote in the chimney. The biggest thing with Creosote build up is the amount of air let up the chimney and the heat and activity of the fire. Granted softer woods will deposit creosote faster if you are not careful, but all woods can still deposit the creosote so don't go around believing that you are safe just because you burn a hardwood.

I burn Pine and cedar woods all the time and we have a specific way to deal with the build up.
Besides doing our own chimney sweeping, we also have a burn indicator that attaches to the outside of our wood stove and shows us the correct operating temp for the woods stove to help prevent creosote build up.

here are some links that explain creosote build up.

What causes creosote build up?

Chimney Safety - Fire Safety At Home - Safety & Prevention - Fire Department - Services & Public Safety - City of Vancouver, Washington, USA

Just remember that EVERY time you burn you are taking a risk of creosote build up.


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Old 11-14-2008, 03:44 AM   #10
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Good old forest service website
Celtis occidentalis

Quote:
WOOD PRODUCTS VALUE :
Hackberry wood is of medium hardness and strength, white to yellowish in
color and rather elastic [25,30]; its specific gravity is 0.49 [25].
This wood makes excellent fuel, almost equaling hickory, and is used
also in the manufacture of cheap furniture. The technical qualities of
hackberry wood resemble those of elm (Ulmus spp.) and white ash
(Fraxinus americana), and it is sometimes used as a substitute for these
species. Hackberry is not a commercially important tree (except as
firewood)
with its low timber value, but when peeled and properly
seasoned hackberry poles serve many useful purposes. However, the wood
is not durable when in contact with the soil [29,30].
http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/agguides/forestry/G05450.pdf

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What about hackberry?



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